Social

Soldering and Brazing are joining processes where materials, similar or dissimilar, are bonded together using a heating method and a filler metal without melting the base materials.  The filler metal melts, wets the base materials, and subsequently flows by capillary action.  Wetting of the base materials by the filler metals is enabled by the use of a suitable flux or by acoustic vibrations.

The difference between soldering and brazing lies in the temperature of the heating process:  soldering occurs at temperatures less than 450°C, and brazing occurs at temperatures over 450°C.  The heating of the filler metal can be accomplished by various methods, including hot plate, induction, torch, and furnace.

EWI utilizes brazing and soldering for customer applications from wide variety of industries, including automotive, aerospace, oil and gas, electronics, medical, heavy manufacturing, and advanced energy. The processes we use include:

  • Conventional Soldering and Brazing
  • Vacuum Brazing
  • Ultrasonic Soldering and Brazing
  • Lead-free Soldering

Latest News

Welcome New Member – Power Drives, Inc.
We would like to welcome Power Drives, Inc., as a…
Read more...
Welcome New Member – BWI Group North America, Inc.
We would like to welcome BWI Group North America, Inc.,…
Read more...
Laser Intrabeam and Diffuse Reflection — Essential Eyewear Alert!
Proper laser eyewear is required whenever a laser is operated…
Read more...
EWI’s Fundamentals of Welding Engineering Class to be offered again this June
EWI's upcoming Fundamentals of Welding Engineering class for March is sold…
Read more...
AMC Meeting at Oak Ridge National Laboratory – Time Well Spent
The latest Additive Manufacturing Consortium event held at ORNL earlier this…
Read more...
International Institute of Welding to meet at EWI in April
  EWI is pleased to announce that we will host…
Read more...
A Successful AMC Winter Meeting held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory
          The Additive Manufacturing Consortium (AMC)…
Read more...
Resonance Fatigue of Low Modulus Materials
Resonance fatigue of tubular steel goods has become a relatively…
Read more...